By Justin Walker

We’ve all heard the old saying “April showers bring May flowers.”

It’s a great saying. Positive. Hopeful.

But farmers and ranchers need timely rains all year long, not just this time of year. And for some, they received exactly what they asked for.

Many parts of Texas have seen rainfall in 2019. A blessing for some crops. Wheat is expected to have a good season thanks to rains early in the year.

But it’s going to take more as we move into April. And it’s not guaranteed.

In fact, some parts of the Lone Star State are starting to dry up.

That’s a big change from early January, when only 0.8 percent of Texas was experiencing any level of drought.

Now, 11 percent is abnormally dry or worse with much of that being in the southern portions of the state where the most severe drought conditions are found along the Mexico border.

But the impact of dry conditions is felt elsewhere. Farmers and ranchers in the Panhandle, North and Central Texas are noticing a need for rain, especially as they plant this year’s crops.

Luckily, forecasts look optimistic, but you still never know with Mother Nature.

Nevertheless, farmers and ranchers will be out tending to crops and livestock. Because that’s what they do—work hard with what they are given.

In Texas, April showers may bring May flowers. But it takes rain all year long to grow the food and fiber we all depend on.

Justin Walker

Communications Specialist
Texas Farm Bureau
I could spend all day at the show barns, hiking through state parks or watching college football. Lucky for me, Texas is home to the best places to do all three.