By Haley Herzog

Why do some people have beef with beef?

For generations, our parents and grandparents viewed beef as a nutritious and healthy food. Most of them can be identified as “meat and potato” kind of people.

But today, views are much different. Opinions seem to be constantly divided between whether or not beef is healthy.

It’s easy for many to associate red meat as a food that is off limits. But let’s get something straight, beef is still a great option for dinner. And breakfast, lunch and snack. Beef is great for any meal!

A recent research study by Purdue University found that certain eating patterns that include lean red meats are highly effective in supporting a healthy heart.

This adds to the ever-growing body of science demonstrating that beef, along with other red meats, are a vital part of a healthy diet.

But don’t just take our word for it. Check out the facts below.

Specific findings from the research study, published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, include:

  • Consuming 7 to 18 ounces of fresh, lean red meat a week can improve cardiometabolic risk factors.
  • Including 18 ounces of fresh, lean red meat per week in your dietary pattern was found to be more effective in lowering LDL cholesterol than only consuming 7 ounces.
  • Those consuming 18 ounces of fresh, lean red meat saw a reduction in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and blood pressure.

A 3 ounce serving of lean beef is about the size of one deck of cards. So, consuming between 3 to 6 of those a week would be considered part of a healthy eating style.

In a nutshell: A pattern of eating that incorporates this amount of fresh, lean red meat can lower the presence of a number of risk factors such as obesity, high glucose or lipid levels, diabetes and heart disease.

The ongoing beef with beef isn’t justified.

Beef is packed with health-promoting amino acids. It’s rich in nutrients, full of vitamins and essential for maintaining our optimal health.

Beef has a place at my table and it always will.

Click here for more information about beef as part of a healthy diet.

 

Julie Tomascik

Associate Editor

As a third generation rancher, I prefer the outdoors to the kitchen. After all, there’s no better feeling than dirt under my feet and wind whipping through my hair. But I’m slowly learning my way around the kitchen.

Facebook Twitter